Researches

Nepotism Prevalence in the Workplace Survey Report

Nepotism Prevalence in the Workplace Survey Report

Introduction

 

This report presents the results of a study to find out the prevalence of nepotism within Zimbabwean workplaces. A total of 1 173 employees responded to the survey.

The Wikipedia definition of nepotism is “Nepotism is based on favouritism granted to relatives in various fields, including business, politics, entertainment, sports, religion and other activities.”

Methodology

 

A questionnaire was emailed to employees on the IPC database across all sectors of the economy who are registered in our database. The questionnaire was dispatched through the Survey Monkey online platform.

Result

 

Descriptive Statistics

The average age of the participating employees is 38 years with the maximum being 63 years old. 62.8 % of those surveyed were male and 37.2% were female. Manufacturing and Banking contributed 11.3% each to the participants.  Professional Services (10.2%), state enterprises (9.1%), NGOs (8.8%), financial services (7.5%), telecoms (5.4%), agriculture (5.2%) and retail (4.7%). The rest of the sectors had less than 5%. 38.8% of the participants did not indicate the sector they are working in. The average work experience for the participants is 8.8 years.  60.8% of the participants are managerial employees and 39.2% were non- managerial. Over 47% of the participants had a post graduate degree, 33.5% first degree and 13.4% had diploma. The rest of the participants had other qualifications below a Diploma.

 

Study Shortcomings

The study used a convenient sample of people already in the IPC database. The database consists of over 40 000 employees of which 1 173 responded. The study used the email function embedded in the Survey Monkey platform to reach out to participants. This excludes employee, especially low level employees who have no access to email.  Despite this shortcoming we are 95% confident that the sample and results captures the Zimbabwean working population’s sentiments on nepotism.

Main Findings

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